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This strip will tell if your kid has asthma

It may take a great deal of patience and time to confirm asthma when a child is rushed to a clinic with breathing complication or coughing fits for it involves taking an x-ray and then getting the toddler to breathe through a mouthpiece of a device. But a tiny strip can soon do that job saving valuable time and letting a physician begin treatment right away.

A team of researchers at VIT University has developed the strip that allows doctors to conduct a non-invasive breath test and get results within a matter of seconds. The white strip would turn blue when an asthmatic breathes over it. The strip, which has been tested in laboratories, will soon undergo clinical trials before it hits the market.

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